Posted on: Sep 18, 2018

How Child Support is Calculated in ArkansasRegardless of a parent’s relationship to their former spouse, they are still obligated to support their children.

This is true regardless of whether or not you have custody and does not depend on your right to visitation.

Each state defines how much a non-custodial parent must pay.

In this regard, Arkansas is no different.

If you are in a financial tight spot, need to reorganize your child custody payments, or need to change the terms of those arrangements, an Arkansas divorce attorney can help.

The Harris Law Firm has helped a number of clients change child support arrangements and visitation schedules. If you need someone to advocate on your behalf, give us a call or contact us online today.

How to Calculate Child Support in Arkansas

The Arkansas Rules and Administrative Order Number 10 provides child support guidelines. There are two considerations the Court must make. The first is the welfare of the children. The court’s primary concern will be seeing that the children are being adequately supported by both parents. Secondly, the non-custodial parent who is paying the child support must not face undue stress. We’ll talk more about that below.

The Non-Custodial Parent’s Monthly Income Determines Support

Arkansas defines the word “income” rather loosely. It is not merely the money you bring home from work. It does include that, but it also incomes tax returns, workers’ compensation, injury settlements, investment returns, and interest as well. That list is non-exhaustive. Basically, the Court considers any income from any source income. The Court factors all income into your child support payments.

Arkansas has a chart that they use that is updated periodically. I will look something like this:

  • One dependent, the partent pays 15% of their overall income
  • Two dependents, the partent pays 21% of their overall income
  • Three dependents, the partent pays 25% of their overall income
  • Four dependents, the partent pays 28% of their overall income
  • Five dependents, the partent pays 30% of their overall income
  • Six dependents, the partent pays 32% of their overall income

What Happens if a Non-Custodial Parent Doesn’t Work?

If the court determines that a non-custodial parent’s contribution to the child’s support is not enough, they may attempt to determine whether or not the parent is unemployed or underemployed purposefully to spite a former lover or spouse. If the court determines that this is the case, they may impute income to the parent. In other words, the court will take more of your money because it decides you are not working up to your full earning potential.

Contact an Arkansas Family Law Attorney Today

If you need to change a child support arrangement with your former spouse or the parent of your child or children, call the family law attorneys at the Harris Law Firm. We can help you if there is a change in your finances or you want to renegotiate a current arrangement. Give us a call or contact us online today.

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